Magmatism and mineralization of the Ash Peak area, Arizona
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Magmatism and mineralization of the Ash Peak area, Arizona petrochemical interpretations by Walker, Robert J.

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Published .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Volcanic ash, tuff, etc. -- Arizona -- Ash Peak Region.,
  • Geology -- Arizona -- Ash Peak Region.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby Robert James Walker.
The Physical Object
Pagination186 leaves, bound :
Number of Pages186
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL15528773M

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magmatism in northwestern Arizona is 75 to 70 Ma, in the Morenci area is 62 to 51 Ma, in eastern Arizona and New Mexico is 60 to 52 Ma, and in the Tombstone Hills is 66 to 62 Ma. Miocene and Early Pliocene Epithermal Gold-Silver Deposits in the Northern Great Basin, Western United States: Characteristics, Distribution, and Relationship to Magmatism DAVID A. JOHN† U.S. Geological Survey, Mail Stop , . @article{osti_, title = {Miocene calc-alkaline magmatism, calderas, and crustal extension in the Kofa and Castle Dome Mountains, southwestern Arizona}, author = {Grubensky, M J and Bagby, W C}, abstractNote = {Two widespread lower Miocene rhyolite ash flow tuffs in the Kofa and Castle Dome Mountains of southwestern Arizona are products of caldera-forming eruptions. Temporal evolution of the Laramide arc: U-Pb geochronology of plutons associated with porphyry copper mineralization in east-central Arizona. in Pearthree, P.A., ed., Geologic Excursions in Southwestern North America: Geological Society of America Field Gu p.

Cenozoic subduction along western North America is widely recognized as a major contributor to the geologic evolution of this region. Associated Cascades arc magmatism (McBirney, ) is universally accepted as representing subduction of the oceanic Farallon plate beneath North tion and related Cascades arc magmatism were progressively extinguished at Cited by: Magmatism, ash-flow tuffs, and calderas of the ignimbrite flareup in the western Nevada volcanic field, Great Basin, USA Article in Geosphere 9(4) August with 87 Reads.   Arizona has primary lode gold deposits, some placer gold deposits and many copper deposits that produce by-product gold and silver. Hidden gold deposits are likely to be found in several of the known mining districts. The ramblings in this blog will lead up to another book by the author to be published in , entitled "Gold in Arizona" which will be . Just south of Denver, erosional remnants of 37 Ma Late Eocene Wall Mountain tuff or ignimbrite (AKA Castle Rock ^rhyolite) up to 40' thick record one of the opening shots of the Early Phase in the east — the arrival of a devastating ash flow erupted from the Mt. Princeton area km (86 mi) to the east in the Sawatch Range. The massive ash.

Arizona Bureau of Geology and Mineral Technology: Special Papers 11×”, softcover, and illustrated unless noted. Arizona Special Paper 2: Guidebook to the Geology of Central Arizona, by D.M. Burt and T.L. Péwé, , Softcover, 11×″, pages, very nice illustrations. Field Trip Guidebook for the 74th Regional Meeting of the Cordilleran Section, The Geological . Mineralogical and sulfur isotopic characterization of the sulfur-bearing mineralization from the active degassing area of Campi Flegrei caldera (southern Italy). In EGU General Assembly Conference Abstracts (Vol. 17). The Sierra Madre Occidental is a major mountain range system of the North American Cordillera, that runs northwest–southeast through northwestern and western Mexico, and along the Gulf of Sierra Madre is part of the American Cordillera, a chain of mountain ranges (cordillera) that consists of an almost continuous sequence of mountain ranges that form the Peak: Cerro Mohinora. Two widespread lower Miocene rhyolite ash flow tuffs in the Kofa and Castle Dome Mountains of southwestern Arizona are products of caldera-forming eruptions. These closely erupted tuffs, the tuff of Yaqui Tanks and the tuff of Ten Ewe Mountain, are approximately 22 Ma in age and their eruptions culminate a 1- to 2-m.y.-long burst of calc.